About Rosily Vineyard

“This quiet achiever from Margaret River excels” – Peter Forrestal

 

 
Sustainable simplicity…

Rosily Vineyard is dedicated to making wines of excellence, that truly reflect the unique Margaret River environment from which they are derived.

We believe in respecting our environment, and working with it in a sustainable way to produce superior quality fruit from healthy, well balanced vines. We believe in working with this fruit through the winemaking process, so that the varietal and regional characteristics are there to be enjoyed in each and every bottle.

All of our fruit is hand harvested from our own vines, and all of our wines are produced in our own winery.

The story behind the name

Rosily Vineyard Established: 1994

Rosily Vineyard is named after Vice-Admiral Count François-Étienne de Rosily-Mesros (1748-1832), a French Navigator and Cartographer, who was intimately involved in the ongoing French explorations of Western Australia during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Rosily was an ensign on the ‘Gros Ventre’ commanded by Louis de St. Alouarn in 1772. He had started the voyage on the Gros Ventre’s sister ship, the ‘Fortune’ commanded by Yves Joseph de Kerguelen-Trémarec, but had become separated whilst undertaking a survey of the newly discovered Kerguelen Island. Due to bad weather, Kergeulen turned back to Mauritius, abandoning the unfortunate Rosily and his crew, who were luckily rescued later by Louis de St. Alouarn. The ‘Gros Ventre’ continued east until it encountered the south west coast of Australia at Cape Leeuwin, where Rosily made the first, but very accurate survey of Flinders Bay. They then sailed north to Shark Bay where Rosily made another accurate map of that section of the coast. It was here, at Dirk Hartog Island, that St. Alouarn formally annexed Western Australia for France.

By the 1820s, Rosily had risen to the influential position of Director of the Hydrographic Office in Paris, and was one of the few who were enthusiastic about future French settlement in Western Australia. France, like Britain, was experiencing an overcrowding problem in its gaols, and by the early 1820s Western Australia was seen as a potential French penal colony. Rosily and others championed this idea, and several expeditions were sent to make detailed surveys of the South West in preparation for establishing a settlement. The French activity alarmed the British enough to despatch a contingent of men from their colony in New South Wales to occupy King George Sound in December 1826, and to claim the whole of Western Australia for Britain. The French threat was averted, and the planting of the first Margaret River vineyards was thus delayed by many decades!

Rosily Vineyard uses the attractive French ‘Fleur-de-lys’ motif on its labels, as a reminder of the French connection that nearly was. The Fleur-de-lys, a stylised flower, is actually an ancient symbol with connections to many cultures. In early Christianity it symbolised the Holy Trinity and can be seen in carvings in many churches and cathedrals. It was a symbol of the French Monarchy, appearing on banners and flags until the French Revolution. It was also used to show north on early charts.

The owners of Rosily Vineyard, Ken and Dot Allan and Mike and Barb Scott, recognised the importance of Rosily in the early discovery of Western Australia. He was an outstanding Cartographer and was part of St. Alouran’s party which took possession of Western Australia for France on the morning of 30th March 1772. Rosily produced an accurate chart of Shark Bay which showed the location of Dirk Hartog Island where they buried two bottles with charts sealed with a silver French coin and a lead seal.

Mike Scott, of Rosily Vineyard, has a keen interest in this maritime history having dived on or done exploration work on the Dutch shipwrecks ‘Gilt Dragon’, ‘Batavia’, ‘Zeewyk’ and the ‘Zuydtorp’. A colleague of Mike’s was Max Cramer who discovered the wreck of the Batavia. Max used the chart of Shark Bay drawn by Rosily and enlarged to same size as current maritime charts. He was amazed at the accuracy of this chart and used it in an expedition to find a bottle and coin left by Rosily’s party in March 1772.

Rosily Vineyard Environmental Statement

At Rosily Vineyard we take great care to craft our wines in a way that allows them to reflect the environment in which our grapes are grown. We understand that the health and sustainability of our environment is vital. Over the decades since our vines were planted we have applied continuous improvements to our vineyard practices, which have helped us reduce our environmental impact and ensure our long term environmental sustainability. Our minimal input philosophy is now being backed up with our commitment to achieving organic certification, thus ensuring that our environmental stewardship is carried out in actions as well as words. Specific activities undertaken at Rosily to ensure the best possible environmental outcomes include:

  • No use of synthetic pesticides, herbicides or fungicides.
  • No use of synthetic fertilisers.
  • Minimal tillage and maintenance of a permanent sward of diverse volunteer species.
  • Hand removal of unwanted weed species.
  • No surface water catchment or bores used in vineyard irrigation.
  • Efficient use of water with low evaporation drippers and optimised irrigation scheduling.
  • Minimal irrigation, with less than 0.5 megalitres used for whole vineyard per year.
  • Winery water provided by captured rainwater.
  • Balanced vines with appropriate yield levels for each variety and soil type.
  • Hand pruned vines and hand harvested fruit.
  • Shoot positioned, leaf plucked and hedged to provide a healthy microclimate and minimise organic fungicide requirements.
  • Sound vineyard hygiene; 100% estate grown fruit used in our wines, with the minimal contractor equipment that is used being thoroughly washed down on each occasion.
  • Continual assessment of vine and soil health.
  • A portion of property set aside as non-productive, with native species planted to encourage a diverse ecosystem.
  • Low food miles. All our fruit is grown on the property, with the furthest distance between vine and winery being less than half a kilometre and the closest vines being harvested about 15 meters from the crusher.

Together these actions – which are in the process of being backed up by organic certification – aim to ensure that the environment in which we operate is nurtured and sustained both now and into the future.

OUR PEOPLE

Mick Scott – Winemaker

Having helped plant the first vines at Rosily Vineyard, Mick went on to study winemaking and earn a degree in oenology from Charles Sturt University. He then refined his skills working vintages around Australia and in France, and then returned to Margaret River to join the winemaking team at Pierro. Having also fulfilled various winemaking and viticultural consultancy roles in the region, Mick finally returned to his family business as winemaker at Rosily in 2013. Mick is an expert at creating quality wines from quality grapes, and his wines have won numerous accolades from around the nation and internationally.

Ben Allan – Sales and Distribution Manager

Working closely with David Mullen at David Mullen Wine Agency, Ben supplies the top restaurants, bars and bottle shops of West Australia with a great range of fine wines. Ben is also responsible for ensuring the professional distribution of our wines throughout the rest of Australia and the world.

Sam Castleden – Manager

Sam became interested in viticulture after he took a casual job planting the original vines at Rosily in 1994. The close relationship that he formed with all 19,816 vines planted meant that he couldn’t leave. Watching Rosily develop from a grass covered hill in 1994, through to the Wine Industry of WA’s “Most Outstanding New Winery” in 2003, and on to becoming the well regarded premium Margaret River wine producer that it is today, ensures that Sam never regrets meeting his 19,816 friends.

Ian Watt – Viticultural Assistant and Maintenance Officer

Ian has worked at Rosily Vineyard since before the first vines were planted in 1994. After the vines and the wines, Ian’s passions are all things that aren’t broken, and tea. When things break, he fixes them with extreme efficiency so that he can return to sipping tea without delay. He is also highly adept at driving a tractor at 7.5 kmph (with or without a dog on his lap).

Rosily Vineyard

A single, certified organic vineyard in the heart of the Wilyabrup wine region provides all of the fruit for Rosily Vineyards wines. With dedicated, hands-on attention to both vines and wines, winemaker Mick Scott consistently produces high-class wines that enjoy both critical acclaim and show success

OWNERS : Ken Allan, Dot Allan, Mike Scott and Barb Scott
WINEMAKERS : Mike Scott
ESTABLISHED : 1994
VINEYARD LOCATION : Wilyabrup
ANNUAL CRUSH : 80 tonnes
VARIETIES : Chardonnay, Semillon, Malbec, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Shiraz, Sauvignon Blanc, Grenache

CELLAR DOOR : 871 Yelverton Road, Wilyabrup
OPEN : Saturdays and school holidays
WINE PRICES : $18 -50
PHONE : 5755 6336
EMAIL : sales@rosily.com.au
WEBSITE : www.rosily.com.au
DISTRIBUTION : Cellar Door, Wholesaler, Online, Mail Order, Winery

Rosily semillon sauvignon blanc 2012 ($25)

With the use of French oak here, this wine was set up from the start to support medium-term ageing. And it has come along quite beautifully with a toasty lemon butter aroma and a rich engaging palate. It shows yet again that, when well made with some winemaking influence, these wines really do have cellaring potential, reaching another dimension in complexity.
SCORE 93/100 CELLAR 3 Years

Rosily sauvignon blanc 2017 ($20)

Lip-smacking fresh acidity drives this persistent savvy to a long finish, but the key is the lemony oak influence; not overdone, but there to add some important complexity. This is a lovely wine with a subtle creamy texture that fills the palate while the citrussy edge keeps it tight and crunchy. Leave it in the cellar for a few years to get something extra out of it.
SCORE 91/100 CELLAR 4 years

Rosily semillon sauvignon blanc 2017 ($20)

Follows the Rosily style of adding a smidgeon of oak. It works so well and creates the structure and palate to enable it to age for a few years, creating something beyond the standard fare for this blend. Texturally terrific. Crunchy and vibrant with a juicy character that is so appealing. You could drink a bit of this.
SCORE 92/100 CELLAR 6 years

Rosily merlot 2015 ($20)

Mighty good merlot, especially when you consider the price. Lots of flesh and deep intensity with firm tannins and some quality oak. It adds up to a merlot with presence and structure, something you often don’t get in Australia. Dry savoury finish makes this a wonderful wine with pastas.
SCORE 90/100 CELLAR 5 years

Rosily Reserve cabernet sauvignon 2014 ($25)

Super vintage and probably the best Rosily wine yet released. This is a substantial wine with an imposing presence. First-class oak has been used to integrate with the fruit from this cracking year. Has a powdery dry thread through the sweeter fruit, while the tannin is superbly managed. Super wine.
SCORE 96/100 CELLAR 20 years

Certified Organic

From the strong and structured Cabernet grown in the challenging top-of-hill gravels, to the full and fruity Semillon grown in the rich alluvial soils close to a gentle brook; our grapes are grown on unique parcels of soil, in a unique part of the world – and this is reflected in the quality of our wines.

All of Rosily’s wines are produced using fruit grown on our 12ha vineyard,  which is planted on specifically chosen parcels of land within the 32ha Willyabrup property.

The four largest blocks of the vineyard are planted on a gentle hill sloping down to a tributary of a small stream which flows in the winter months. Additional blocks are planted on selected parcels of soils closer to the winter streams. Across the property the soil types vary from deep gravelly loams, to coarse gravels, to lighter sandy soils over a clay base.

Our vine rows all run east-west, and are 3.3m apart with vines planted every 1.8m along the row.  This gives us a total of almost 21,000 vines – of 12 different varieties.

All Margaret River vineyards enjoy the benefits of good winter rainfall, and of sunny, dry ripening seasons that avoid excessive heat given the cooling influence of the Indian Ocean.  But within the Margaret River wine region, there are sub-regional differences that depend on latitude and on the distance from the ocean.

Rosily Vineyard is found in the heart of the Willyabrup sub region, which is close to the coast and of a central to slightly northern latitude within the Margaret River wine region.

Within each  sub-region, a single vineyard’s unique combination of soil types and micro-climates play a huge role in final wine quality, and on how different wine grape varieties will grow on different parts of the block. With all our fruit grown on the single vineyard, we are truely able to produce wines with a sense of place.

The importance of the health of our vineyard is paramount to the quality of our wines, and sustainability of our vineyard is also recognised as being vital. We believe that the process of organic certification for our vineyard is testament to our commitment to looking after the land.


Owner / Vineyard Manager

From the strong and structured Cabernet grown in the challenging top-of-hill gravels, to the full and fruity Semillon grown in the rich alluvial soils close to a gentle brook; our grapes are grown on unique parcels of soil, in a unique part of the world – and this is reflected in the quality of our wines.

All of Rosily’s wines are produced using fruit grown on our 12ha vineyard,  which is planted on specifically chosen parcels of land within the 32ha Willyabrup property.

The four largest blocks of the vineyard are planted on a gentle hill sloping down to a tributary of a small stream which flows in the winter months. Additional blocks are planted on selected parcels of soils closer to the winter streams. Across the property the soil types vary from deep gravelly loams, to coarse gravels, to lighter sandy soils over a clay base.

Our vine rows all run east-west, and are 3.3m apart with vines planted every 1.8m along the row.  This gives us a total of almost 21,000 vines – of 12 different varieties.

All Margaret River vineyards enjoy the benefits of good winter rainfall, and of sunny, dry ripening seasons that avoid excessive heat given the cooling influence of the Indian Ocean.  But within the Margaret River wine region, there are sub-regional differences that depend on latitude and on the distance from the ocean.

Rosily Vineyard is found in the heart of the Willyabrup sub region, which is close to the coast and of a central to slightly northern latitude within the Margaret River wine region.

Within each  sub-region, a single vineyard’s unique combination of soil types and micro-climates play a huge role in final wine quality, and on how different wine grape varieties will grow on different parts of the block. With all our fruit grown on the single vineyard, we are truely able to produce wines with a sense of place.

The importance of the health of our vineyard is paramount to the quality of our wines, and sustainability of our vineyard is also recognised as being vital. We believe that the process of organic certification for our vineyard is testament to our commitment to looking after the land.

Wine Making Process

Rosily Vineyard

871 Yelverton Road, Willyabrup Western Australia, 6280

CONTACT

Phone 61 (08) 9755 6336
Fax 61 (08) 9755 6336
sam@rosily.com.au

Website

https://www.rosily.com.au/

CELLAR DOOR

Winery is open for public tastings on (most) Saturdays 11:00 – 5:00 and school holidays 11:00 – 5:00, or by appointment.

 

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RAY'S WINE GUIDE 2017